Hunting for Easter Eggs at Dyffryn Gardens

There’s nothing our children love more than an Easter egg hunt. They love following clues and peeking in corners to find their chocolate treasures.

We’ve never been to an organised hunt before, but, as National Trust members, the Cadbury Easter Egg Hunt at Dyffryn Gardens seemed like a good option, especially as it’s one of our favourite places to visit.

We booked in advance when the tickets went on sale at £6 per child and a small booking fee. It’s a popular event so booking in advance is recommended.

When we got to the gardens, we were directed to Dyffryn House where the children were given instructions and we were told how it works.

Each child was given an activity leaflet and a pencil. They had to find eggs containing flowers dotted around the gardens and match the pictures inside to the colour of the ribbons on top. When they’d found all the eggs, they had to return to the house to claim their prize.

After that, we were off to explore and locate those eggs. Finding the first one was a little tricky, but the children were thrilled when they found it.

After finding that initial egg, the discoveries sped up. They loved exploring the gardens and were so pleased with each discovery.

I found it helpful that the areas where the trail ended were clearly marked, which helped us to stay in the right area and avoid going off course.

We spent around 45 minutes on the hunt and the children ran back to the house clutching their explorer sheets to claim their prize, a Cadbury’s Easter egg. They were delighted!

All in all, it was well organised and pretty good value for what it was. The children loved it and I think we’ll be back again next year!

Did you go to the Dyffryn egg hunt? If so, what did you think?

The Cadbury Easter Egg hunt cost £6 per child. Admission to the gardens was free as Trust members, but is chargeable to non-members. Visit here to find out more.

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Six places to visit on a South West England staycation

Since our son started school a few years ago, I’ve found February half term a challenge. The weather can be too wet and cold for days out so it can end up being an expensive and stir crazy week.

As our daughter has now started school, I decided to book us a little break – a staycation in Devon.

We stayed in a Hornbeam Lodge in Lady’s Mile Holiday Park in Dawlish. As it’s out of season, the Monday to Friday break cost us less than £300 for a spacious two-bedroom lodge with a bath, an ensuite and a hot tub . The park has a mix of pitches, static caravans and lodges and our lodge was spotlessly clean and well-presented.

Although a little dated in places, the park has a warm indoor pool, a restaurant, a small gym, a hairdresser’s, an arcade and bowling alley. Other facilities such as the on-site shop, chip shop and outdoor pool were closed due to the time of year.

We made it our base for a range of family days out. We also broke up the journey from South Wales with a stop at around half way.

Here’s what we did and thought about our South West staycation.

1. Bristol Zoo

We broke up our travel to Dawlish with a visit to Bristol Zoo. Our daughter hasn’t been before and our son couldn’t remember his trip as a toddler so it felt like a good chance for a visit.

The children loved seeing the animals – with the monkeys, lion and gorillas selected as their favourites – and to learn more about them. Its focus on conservation helped us talk to the children about caring for animals and our environment.

They enjoyed the zoo detectives trail that was running for half term spotting the relevant items and pictures around the zoo.

I loved the underwater walkway as we could watch the seals and the penguins swim past us.

Entry prices vary, but we booked online as it’s slightly cheaper. We paid £15 per adult and took advantage of the children go free at half term offer that was running. Parking was £3.

2. Killerton House

It’s nearly six months since we joined the National Trust and I make sure we make the most of our membership by visiting new places near home or when we’re away.

So on our first full holiday day, we headed to Killerton in Broadclyst, Exeter.

We walked the spacious grounds and visited the grand house including its Votes for Women? exhibition, which tells the tale of two Killerton women who sat on opposite sides of the suffrage campaign.

It gave us the chance to talk about the centenary of some women being given the opportunity to vote and the exhibition asks visitors to vote for and against.

The children enjoyed spotting the small toy mice hidden in the rooms dressed in suffrage and anti-suffrage colours. Our daughter also enjoyed dressing up as a suffragette and trying out the different hats.

Killerton also houses a fantastic fashion collection which showed the changes in fashion over the decades.

Killerton is free for National Trust members. Entry prices for non-members can be found here.

3. Babbacombe Model Village

We visited Babbacombe Model Village near Torquay for a fun few hours out. The children enjoyed seeing miniature villages, people and models.

New additions such as The Great British Bake Off and celebrity mansion kept me entertained too. They also enjoyed the free crazy golf and its 4D cinema experience.

With off peak prices, we paid £26 to visit as a family. There is a pay and display car park outside the model village.

4. Babbacombe Cliff Railway

Just a few minutes’ walk from the model village, you’ll find Babbacombe Cliff Railway.

Open since 1926, it takes passengers down the steep cliff to Oddicombe beach with views of the English Riviera.

We enjoyed the fairly unique journey to the lovely flat beach, where we skimmed stones and had a picnic before stepping back on board.

The return journey for four cost £9.60. The service also offers 10 rides for £10 (five returns).

5. Exmouth

After wrapping up warm, we had a brisk walk and visit to Exmouth beach. It is a beautiful sandy stretch and the children enjoyed hunting for shells, pebbles and sticks.

After a short walk, we thawed out in Oceans Soft Play, a beautifully clean soft play centre with sweeping views of the beach.

The children loved tearing around and it gave us all a chance to warm up.

Finally, we stopped for a delicious lunch at the Proper Fish and Chips Co, which makes high quality fare cooked to order.

6. Tyntesfield

As we made our way home to South Wales, we decided to stop at Tyntesfield in Bristol to stretch our legs. This is a very special National Trust property and the house is a must see. You need to get tickets upon entry to visit the house, which is filled with fascinating artworks and collections that bring the house to life.The grounds are beautiful and the children loved running free and exploring.Entry is free for National Trust members. Admission prices for non-members can be found here.

15 things you’ll learn as a parent on a day out at a theme park

1. Someone always needs a wee at the worst time. Either when you’re 50 miles from a service station or mid-way through a mind-bogglingly long queue for a ride with no loo nearby.

2. When you do locate a loo, the queue will be as long as the one for the rollercoaster.

3. You will fantastise about ankle-ramming the people who absentmindedly stop in front of your buggy. Look where you’re going people.

4. You will have arms of a weightlifter by the end of the day from carrying your toddler who has to walk absolutely everywhere and then needs to be carried absolutely everywhere as their little legs can’t cope.

5. You start to question your principled decision to refuse forking out for queue jump tickets after enduring 45 minutes waiting for a two-minute ride with an energetic and impatient toddler. There will be tantrums, tears and short-lived bribery snacks. 

6. And those smug queuebuster pass holders will always turn up when you get to the front of the queue meaning you have another final wait to go. And you will hate them for it.

7. The drinks and snacks you’ve lovingly prepared in advance will be refused in favour of a soft drink and packet of crisps that cost £3.99. Each.

8. You will fork out a small fortune at the gift shop while knowing you could get the same thing much cheaper on Amazon. Much cheaper.

9. Your child will find it impossible to chose what they want in said shop. And they’ll always insist on something that costs the same as the theme park ticket. You’ll then face a miserable battle of wills trying to convince them that the small teddy is just as good as the £65 play set they’ve set their little heart on.

10. Someone will always end up getting their clothes (or shoes) soaked. 

11. You spend an age getting into the car park and have to park a long walk from the theme park entrance. That walk feels even longer when walking back there and trying to locate your car with overtired children. What row were we in again?

12. You need to be prepared for all weather eventualities so you’ll be carting around enough gear for a week abroad. Coats ✅ sun hats ✅ wellies ✅ sun cream ✅ 

13. Finding your way out is as difficult as finding your way there. How is it so complicated? 

14. You’ll feel like you’ve walked a marathon by the end of the day but your Fitbit only says 8,000 steps.

15. You’ll forget all of the above when you and the children remember the day and look back at magical photos. All completely worth it. Now, where’s the wine? 😉

A trip to Folly Farm Wales – a review

Pembrokeshire’s Folly Farm is a popular day out for families in Wales and that includes us. 

Boasting both exotic and farmyard animals and a fantastic range of indoor and outdoor play, it was has won accolades from TripAdvisor for being a top family day out.

We do a family day out to Folly Farm at least once a year and it gets better with every visit with new animals and updated sections. 

Our first stop was the barn, where you can find traditional farm animals including goats, pigs, donkeys and a variety of chickens. The hatchery allows children to watch eggs hatch and the interactive cwtch corner enables them to cuddle smaller animals such as guinea pigs. 

The children then made their way to the vast outdoor play park starting with the sand diggers. They both loved digging mounds and steering the diggers. Then it was off to the different sections of the park to explore the pirate ships, castle and network of slides and tunnels.


After an hour of play, we made our way to see the more exotic animals including rhinos, meerkats, lions, zebra and the giraffes. 

One of the lovely things about Folly Farm is the interactive and educational element that accompanies each species meaning you learn along the way. Our five-year-old loved the measuring chart which showed him how tall he was in comparison to a baby giraffe. 

There is excellent information about conservation too, which is helpful to start talking to children about these issues.


Our highlights were seeing the the giraffes and the visit to penguin cove. Both of our children were thrilled to see the penguins swimming, especially through the glass viewing area. 



We ate lunch at the fast food diner at the soft play centre. It cost us £26 for two adult and children’s meals and drinks. The food was good and portions were very ample. There were other dining options including a cafe near the entrance, but we decided on a treat after two hours’ exploring. The children then burnt off some energy by racing around the vast soft play area before returning outside for more play and animals.


The facilities at Folly Farm are great for accessibility, including prams and wheelchairs. There are plentiful drinking water stations and toilets, which is vitally important when venturing out with a recently toilet-trained toddler! 

It cost around £45 for the four of us to get in, but we exchanged our Tesco Clubcard vouchers for four times the value in advance to pay towards the entrance cost. 

The entry fee covers the vast majority of activities at Folly Farm, but some cost a small fee such as the fairground rides.

Overall, we had another fantastic day out at Folly Farm. Fun, informative and interactive.

Blogger note: We paid for our visit to Folly Farm and the venue was unaware I was writing a review.

Colby Woodland Garden – a review

Tucked away in tranquil Amroth in Pembrokeshire, The National Trust’s Colby Woodland Garden is a stunning place to explore. 

It’s a hidden gem of walks, blooms, streams and a never-ending meadow filled with daisies and wild flowers.


After arrival, we headed straight to the walled garden. Walking through the metal gate, you are greeted by trees and gorgeous flowers of all colours. Statues are dotted around walkways and paths and a fountain babbles downstream from a summerhouse. 

As someone who loved The Secret Garden as a child, it felt lovely to look around this hidden place.

The Walled Garden


Our toddler was enchanted by the flowers and the ducks who were taking a swim in the fountains.

From the walled garden, our next step was to find the meadow and the network of paths and bridges around it. The children enjoyed discovering steps and walkways, picking up sticks and leaves and hunting for dandelion clocks. As it’s early May, the bluebells were also out in force.


The children loved the freedom of running through the huge meadow and climbing the fallen tree trunk.

Tired young legs meant we only explored part of this beautiful, expansive place. But what we saw was gorgeous.

There is ample car parking by the garden and a cafe on site serving a selection of meals and light bites for hungry walkers.

We paid £17.50 for a family ticket to the garden, which included access to the walled garden. 


Where are your favourite family days out in Wales? I’d love to know to add them to our to do list.